At 76, Smokey Robinson is still the maestro of make-out songs

Seventy-six year old Smokey Robinson, as important a figure as Berry Gordy in co-creating Detroit’s Motown Records and its sound, a songwriter’s whose songs have been covered by D’Angelo, Dean Martin, Dolly Parton, Brian Ferry, Billy Bragg, Phil Collins, Hall and Oates, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones and once called "America's greatest living poet" by Bob Dylan, sang (and joked) his way through an hour-and-forty-five minute Las Vegas-style set on Saturday night at Fiddler's Green, covering most of the legend’s 55-year show business career.

The story of a Riot Grrrl at Riot Fest 2016

In 1989, when I was 16 years old, I saw Jane’s Addiction for the first time. It changed my life. I grew up in a family of music lovers, but this aggressive, carnal, weird stuff was music my dad would hate.

On Father’s Day, Red Rocks gets Bob Dylan at his cruelest

Father's Day saw a warm early summer evening at Red Rocks, the sort of idyllic atmosphere that's impossible to plan for. Lightning flashed harmlessly in a storm cell off in the distance throughout Sunday's bill, which paired Mavis Staples and the ever-inscrutable Bob Dylan at the storied amphitheater.

Twin Peaks is all grown up on “Down in Heaven”

Call it an unwritten rule or a timeless cliche, but every band must either grow up or break up. Twin Peaks are no different and, fortunately, the Chicago rockers have really matured on “Down in Heaven,” due out May 13 via Grand Jury.

Outlaw country legend Merle Haggard dies at 79

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country giant Merle Haggard, who rose from poverty and prison to international fame though his songs about outlaws, underdogs and an abiding sense of national pride in such hits as "Okie From Muskogee" and "Sing Me Back Home," died Wednesday at 79, on his birthday.