Why So Serious

Why So Serious, Mike Lawrence?

When Kayvan Khalatbari and Andy Juett dubbed their comedy show at the Oriental Theater a "Holiday Sausage Fest," they meant it. The Denver Relief MMJ dispensary co-owner and comedian/producer, respectively, aren't just putting on a show stacked with four excellent dude comedians.

Why So Serious, Tig Notaro?

Tig Notaro has one of those fabled “good problems.” The Los Angeles comedian attracted a new and much larger audience in 2012 after a career-defining set that found her discussing her cancer diagnosis and other life-altering events.

Why So Serious, Rhys Darby?

Flight of the Conchords fans know Rhys Darby as the bumbling band manager Murray Hewitt from the HBO series of the same name. But over the last decade Darby has also forged a successful stand-up career in the U.K., Australia and elsewhere with similarly quirky (if not quite as bobble-headed) material that he's increasingly taking on the road -- including at downtown's Comedy Works Thursday, Oct.

Why So Serious, Keenen Ivory Wayans?

Call it favorite-child syndrome. For all of Keenen Ivory Wayans' work as a writer, actor, director and producer, including groundbreaking comedies like "I'm Gonna Get You Sucka" and Eddie Murphy's legendary concert film "Raw," one project stands out from the pack.

Why So Serious, George Lopez?

When TBS canceled “Lopez Tonight” in 2011, it was an unmistakable blow to its host. Comedian George Lopez had not only made history by becoming the first Latino to helm a major late-night talk show, he also was gaining creative ground by developing his interview chops and diversifying the appeal of his program.

Why So Serious, Beth Stelling?

Judge not Beth Stelling for her professional credits -- although that would be both fair and flattering, since the L.A.-based stand-up sports a number of comedy merit badges, including a recent "Conan" set and a spot on the prestigious Just For Laughs festival in Montreal, in addition to releasing her first album (last year's "Sweet Beth") on Rooftop Comedy.

Why So Serious, Christopher Titus?

Comedian Christopher Titus is best known for his Fox sitcom "Titus," which premiered to rave reviews but only ran for two seasons from 2000-2002 after a series of clashes between its creator and network executives.

Why So Serious, Dr. Drew and Adam Carolla?

Sharp-tongued comedian Adam Carolla and on-air personality Dr. Drew Pinsky have lately been known as a wildly successful podcaster and celebrity rehab adviser (respectively) but the two found fame as co-hosts of "Loveline," the radio-show-turned '90s MTV staple.

Why So Serious, Martin Short?

Martin Short has developed a reputation as one of the nicest, hardest-working guys in Hollywood -- even if the 62-year-old actor-comedian rarely stays in Los Angeles for long, opting to travel most of the time for various stage and screen gigs.

Why So Serious, Rory Scovel?

All seasoned comics have dealt with hecklers or the stray bachelorette party. But when a party bus full of wildly drunken, noisy strippers and their boyfriends comprises the majority of your audience, you've reached a professional milestone — however dubious.

Why So Serious, Chris Miller?

Bringing a great stand-up show together isn't just about intelligent booking and sequencing, although those things help immensely. Nor is just about each performer having a solid set with a good audience.

Why So Serious, Lewis Black?

Lest you think Grammy-winning comedian Lewis Black is all about frothing anger and spittle-flecked tirades, the 64-year-old veteran of "The Daily Show" has a message for you: His blood pressure is actually quite healthy.

Why So Serious, Fortune Feimster?

Like most of the regular comics on Chelsea Handler's late-night "Chelsea Lately" roundtable, Fortune Feimster is quick on her feet and ruthlessly funny. Unlike most of them, she’s got a down-to-Earth charm and relatable act that translates far and wide when she headlines across the country -- as she’ll do this weekend at Comedy Works South.

Why So Serious, Aisha Tyler?

Countless comedians have found success lately with podcasts, while others have concentrated on traditional late-night TV spots, sitcom roles, books, Comedy Central specials and even talk-show hosting gigs.