Gregory Alan Isakov

Gregory Alan Isakov at the Ogden Theatre in Denver (photos)

Just as their first song was fading to a close, Mandolin Orange's Emily Frantz looked at the sold out Ogden Theatre and said, "I knew there were going to be 1600 of you here tonight, I just didn't know you were all going to be listening." And for the rest of the Thursday night, that's what the audience did, they listened, with rapt attention to a night of soaring folk music.

Gregory Alan Isakov and the Colorado Symphony Orchestra at Boettcher Concert Hall, 11-8-13 (review)

The Colorado Symphony Orchestra and Gregory Alan Isakov are, in that order, my two favorite local music acts. For a couple of years now, I've been quite content to alternate my appreciation of their talents, taking in Isakov’s small, intimate records in my car and the orchestra’s large classics in the flesh, over multiple Friday nights at Boettcher Concert Hall.

For Gregory Alan Isakov, everything is personal and none of it is private

Steeped in sincerity and spilling tiny autobiographies, Gregory Alan Isakov isn’t so different in person than he is on record. Sitting on the wood-planked floor of his Boulder apartment, rolling thin cigarettes and answering questions, the South African-born singer-songwriter summons the sort of compact anecdotes that surface in the lyrics of his songs, about growing up, traveling, looking out his window, falling in love.

Gregory Alan Isakov to close out Chautauqua Auditorium summer concert series on Friday

Gregory Alan Isakov certainly feels a strong connection to Chautauqua Auditorium in Boulder, which he will headline for the first time on Sept. 21. Isakov and his band have played the venue on several occasions as an opening act, sharing the stage with such renowned artists as Cowboy Junkies, Indigo Girls and Brandi Carlile -- the latter of whom Isakov has frequently sat in with, most recently opening for her at Red Rocks.