Album Reviews

Album review: Beyoncé, self-titled

Beyonce-album-S

On Beyoncé’s surprise visual album,”Beyoncé,” the singer is a rare pop auteur, making the album she wants to make because she actually can.



Album review: R. Kelly, “Black Panties”

Album review: R. Kelly, "Black Panties."

“Black Panties” is another R. Kelly album to make moms blush and heads shake—sometime to the beat, but mostly in amused disbelief.



Album review: Childish Gambino, “Because The Internet”

Album review: Childish Gambino, "Because the Internet."

Donald Glover’s “Because The Internet” hones in on the rapper’s unique gameness for risk and establishes Childish Gambino as a project to watch.



Album review: Kevin Morby, “Harlem River”

Album review: Kevin Morby, "Harlem River"

It’s got less edge than a slice of bologna, but like spending time at your childhood home, there’s a familiarity in Kevin Morby’s debut, “Harlem River.”



Album review: Death Grips, “Government Plates”

Album review: Death Grips, "Government Plates."

Like Death Grips previous albums, “Government Plates” is a visceral experience brimming with piss, vinegar and—surprise—a hefty dose of electronica.



Album review: Lady Gaga, “ARTPOP”

Album review: Lady Gaga, "ARTPOP"

No one expected “Art Pop” to be anything more than another Lady Gaga album, did they?



Album review: M.I.A., “Matangi”

Album review: M.I.A., "Matangi"

Shot through with hip-hop braggadocio and indian rhythms, “Matangi” is a fun-first, issues-second album—but all M.I.A.



Album review: Arcade Fire, “Reflektor”

Album review: Arcade Fire, "Reflektor."

A little bit dance, a little Greek mythology, Arcade Fire’s “Reflektor” is an unforgettable and immersive album experience.



Album review: Katy Perry, “Prism”

Album review: Katy Perry, "Prism"

There’s no reason to seek out Katy Perry’s “Prism.” Even if you’re curious, it’s only a matter of time before these songs find you.



Album review: The Avett Brothers, “Magpie and the Dandelion”

Album review: The Avett Brothers, "Magpie and the Dandelion"

Culled from the same recording spell that spawned “The Carpenter,” the Avett Brothers’ “Magpie and the Dandelion” claims most of the session’s plaintive moments.