REVIEW: Bruno Mars Fiddler's Green Amphitheatre show - Reverb

REVIEW: Bruno Mars Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre show

Bruno Mars performs during the Pepsi Super Bowl XLVIII Halftime Show at MetLife Stadium on February 2, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.  (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

Bruno Mars performs during the Pepsi Super Bowl XLVIII Halftime Show at MetLife Stadium on February 2, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

NOTE: Bruno Mars did not allow any photography at the Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre show.

In a flash of confetti and personality, Bruno Mars returned for his third Colorado show in a little more than a year on Sunday, facing a crowd of nearly 19,000 roaring fans at Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre. Since he last appeared in Colorado — two shows in early August of last year at Red Rocks — his career has had a few big boosts, including a performance at the Super Bowl.

Wearing his trademark hats, incandescent smile, floodwater pants and sock-less dancing shoes, Mars enchanted the audience — all dance moves and personality. The only thing bigger than his stage presence at Fiddler’s Green on Sunday was Mars’ voice, which was as nimble as his feet. He even acted as his own lead guitarist at times, and hopped on the drums for a solo during his encore (which football fans might remember from his halftime show).

In addition to his powerful vocals and sexy dance moves, the show featured lavish special effects: video, laser lights, a ginormous mirror ball, fireworks, columns of flames and clouds of glittering metallic confetti.

The polished concert included “Billionaire,” “Locked Out of Heaven,” “Gorilla” and “Just the Way You Are.” Always the charmer, Mars dedicated “Just the Way You Are,” to everybody in the audience.

Mars’ energetic band was brassy: Trumpet, saxophone and trombone added sparkle to his songs. The band showed off choreographed boy-band moves, too. The keyboardist performed a mesmerizing solo that gave the crowd a breather and allowed Mars to change his sweaty shirt and hat before an explosive rendition of “Grenade.”

As the show ended, Mars presented each band member to the house, but not with a mere mention. Mars sang — literally — the praises of each player in what must rank as the most elaborate band introduction ever. In the wake of Elvis Presley and Michael Jackson, both of whom he impersonated early in his career, Bruno Mars claimed his title as crown prince — if not king — of pop.

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Colleen Smith is a longtime contributor to The Denver Post and the author of the acclaimed novel “Glass Halo” and “Laid-Back Skier” by Friday Jones Publishing.

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  • scottie

    People can deny all they want, but King B is the (fill in your own blank) of pop. He is not just good, he is great and the best of this generation.