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Dick Clark dead at 82: YouTube videos remembering his legacy

Dick Clark selects a 45-record in his station record library in Philadelphia, Pa. on Feb. 3, 1959. The 29-year-old disc-jockey and television personality presents dance records on American Bandstand, a televised dance show devoted to young people and their music. (AP Photo)
Dick Clark selects a 45-record in his station record library in Philadelphia, Pa. on Feb. 3, 1959. The 29-year-old disc-jockey and television personality presents dance records on American Bandstand, a televised dance show devoted to young people and their music. (AP Photo)

The host with the most, Dick Clark, has left the building. From “Bandstand” to his “Rockin’ Eve,” Clark always had a way with the biggest stars in the music industry.

He will be missed for his amiable nature and his ability to be comfortable in any situation, and here are three of our favorite YouTube moments with Clark and the musicians he helped along the way.

View a photo gallery of Dick Clark through the years.

See Clark talk with Michael Jackson and the Jacksons and ask, “Who’s the boss? Is there a boss?”

Watch Clark crash a Barry Manilow concert at the Forum amid “American Bandstand’s” 30th anniversary special:

And here’s Clark introducing Jerry Lee Lewis and his “Great Balls of Fire:”

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Ricardo Baca is the founder and executive editor of Reverb, the co-founder of The UMS and an award-winning critic and journalist at The Denver Post.